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Seasonal Eating – The Guide to the Seasons

When we talk about seasonal eating, we are talking about a few things that benefit from the idea of “Eating seasonally…”

Firstly, eating seasonally can be provoked by having your own garden, certain things will only grow in certain climate seasons of the year so you only have exposure to those foods for a short time. Allowing more diversity in your eating regime.

Seasonal Eating – Flora Diversity

With diversity and seasonal eating allows the feast and famine notion to apply to our microbiome. Our ancestors laid the foundation of our microbial populations based on the hunter-gatherer stance that we have come to learn about them. To see the diversity of their microbiomes, change over the course of the seasons gave us a fair indication of the impact of not having certain foods for periods of time helping with the maintenance of the internal populations. (Research articles for reading at the bottom)

Nutrient Density and Locality of Grown Goods

Another important factor to consider with seasonal eating is the overall nutrient density of the food from farm/garden – how was it processed, stored, grown, soils, etc. These are things you can have control over if you choose to, pop into your local farmer’s Markets if you want a better indication of what’s in season and more organically grown often. Plus, supporting smaller businesses like your local farmers benefits both of you in the long run!

So without further a-due Here is a composed list of seasonal Foods to use as a guide depending on which hemisphere you are in reading this:

Summer

SUMMER 
ApricotsApples
ArtichokesBasil
Bell PeppersBlueberries
CabbageCarrots
CeleryCherries
ChilliCilantro/ Corriander
CornCucumbers
CurrantsEggplant
FigsGarlic
Green BeansSoy
MarjoramMelons
NectarinesOkra
PeachesPlums
RaspberriesRhubarb
StrawberriesSwiss Chard
Summer SquashTomatoes
TomatillosThyme
WatermelonZucchini
Wild berriesLima and Fava Beans

Autumn/ Fall

AUTUMN/ FALL 
ApplesBeets
Bell peppersBrussel Sprouts
CarrotsCelery
CranberriesCucumbers
CurrantsDates
EggplantGarlic
GourdsKiwi Fruit
LeeksMelons
OnionsPears
PeasPecans
PistachiosPlums
PomegranatesPotatoes
PumpkinQuince
Summer SquashSweet Potato
ThymeTomatoes
TurnipsWalnuts
WatermelonZucchini
Winter SquashSoy
Lima beansFava Beans

Winter

WINTER 
ApplesArugula
Asian PearsBlood Orange
Brussel SproutsCabbage
CarrotsCelery
ClementinesCollards
FennelGuava
KaleKumquats
Mustard GreensOlives
ParsnipsPersimmon
Pomelos (Citrus)Potatoes
PumpkinsOranges
RadishSage
Star FruitSwish Chard
TangerinesTurnips
Winter SquashLettuce

Spring

SPRING 
AsparagusArugula
CeleryChives
Cilantro/CorrianderDill
Fava Beansfield beans
GarlicGreen Beans
LettucePrickly pear
KaleMushrooms
ParsleyPeas/ shoots
Pineappleradishes
RhubarbTurnips
SproutsStrawberries
Swiss ChardWatercress

All Year Rounders

AlmondsBananas
BroccoliCoconut
LimesOnions
AvocadoBokchoy
CauliflowerLemons
MushroomsSpinach

Find out more on Food Tips here

References:

  1. 2017 Aug 25;357(6353):802-806. doi: 10.1126/science.aan4834. Seasonal cycling in the gut microbiome of the Hadza hunter-gatherers of Tanzania. Smits SA1Leach J2,3Sonnenburg ED1Gonzalez CG4Lichtman JS4Reid G5Knight R6Manjurano A7Changalucha J7Elias JE4Dominguez-Bello MG8Sonnenburg JL1.
  2. Annu Rev Genet. 2017 Nov 27;51:413-433. doi: 10.1146/annurev-genet-110711-155532. Epub 2017 Sep 20. The Relationship Between the Human Genome and Microbiome Comes into View. Goodrich JK1,2Davenport ER2Clark AG2Ley RE1,2.

  3. Science. 2012 Jun 8;336(6086):1255-62. doi: 10.1126/science.1224203. Epub 2012 Jun 6. The application of ecological theory toward an understanding of the human microbiome. Costello EK1, Stagaman K, Dethlefsen L, Bohannan BJ, Relman DA.
  4. Mackie RI, Sghir A, Gaskins HR. Developmental microbial ecology of the neonatal gastrointestinal tract. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 May;69:1035S. [PubMed[Google Scholar]
  5. Savage DC. Microbial ecology of the gastrointestinal tract. Annu Rev Microbiol. 1977;31:107.