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Episode 233 – Bits, Bobs and Banter

In today’s episode, Jeff, Matt and Steve jump into the first episode of 2020! Like kids on their first day of school, there is bits, bobs and banter and some great gardening tips to take home. It’s good to be back and excited for a great 2020!

Transcript: 

Speaker 1:

Welcome to the ATP Project, delivering the irreverent truth about health, aging, performance and looking good. If you’re sick and tired of being sick and tired, ready to perform at your best or somewhere in between, then sit back, relax and open your mind as Jeff and Matt battle the status quo and discuss everything health-related that can make you better.

Jeff:

As always, this information is not designed to diagnose, pre-prevent or cure any condition and is for information purposes only. Please discuss any information in this podcast with your healthcare professional before making any changes to your current lifestyle. Stay tuned.

Jeff:

The ATP Project is about to start. Welcome to the ATP Project. You’re with your hosts Matt, Steve and Jeff. Good day, guys.

Steve:

Hey, guys.

Jeff:

Back for 1984, I mean 2020. It’s good to be back.

Steve:

Freudian slip there but it’s almost true, isn’t it?

Jeff:

Yes. This is the light and fluffy podcast. We’re easing our way back into it. It’s going to be a bit all over the place. It’s going to be here, there and everywhere but we’re just going to chin wag, have a chat, talk about what’s been interesting, what’s been happening. Some of it might be deep. Some of it might be very fluffy and light.

Matt:

We’ve done a hell of a lot of prep for this, Jeff. You’re taking out as if we’re just making this up off the top of our heads.

Jeff:

[crosstalk 00:01:24] Steve has.

Matt:

I stole this one off Steve.

Jeff:

You know what is actually a little bit concerning is that I came in today wearing my nice, new navy ATP and it looks like you guys want to get the navy as well, too.

Matt:

Smells so fresh out of the bag.

Steve:

We’re all the navy boys, aren’t we?

Jeff:

Oh.

Matt:

Now you’ve just ruined it.

Jeff:

Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Matt:

Now I want to actually change my shirt. The reality is I was getting boob sweat. I trained. I’ve been getting some extra thermic effects from my training and for no apparent reason. Then that was lead to boob sweat. I considered Botox under there because apparently that works but then I thought, “No, but I’ll get really saggy boobs.”

Jeff:

What I was going to say as well, too, is you want to get in the navy but, Steve, you want the navy in your really so …

Steve:

Yeah, absolutely.

Jeff:

All right. Starting with a fresh start for 2020. Guys, what’s been happening? What’s on your mind?

Steve:

It’s 2020 so everyone’s got these new year’s health resolutions. They look at the calendar and go, “I need to change something in my life. I’ve got fat over Christmas. I’ve been watching too much cricket or footy or whatever,” and they’re overweight and their new year’s resolution is to get healthy and lose weight.

Jeff:

The funny thing is most of the people that are fit and healthy typically take that period, or a lot of people take that period off to enjoy themselves, drink, party, eat lots of food and then they go, “Great, I’m going to get back on track.” A lot of the uninitiated, every year this time comes around and they go, “Right, this year’s going to be different,” N they get five minutes into it and go, “Bugger it, I’ve stuffed it already. I have to wait till 2021.”

Matt:

That’s what I got for Christmas. I got fat. I’ve put on heaps of weight.

Jeff:

Nice.

Matt:

The cool thing is with 2020 it’s a new decade so we can go back and go not just a normal new year’s resolution anymore. We’ll go back and look at what we’ve learned and go, “Right, we realize that most people do these resolutions around diet and exercise or I’m not going to smoke or I’m not going to drink or I’m going to avoid this.” We’ve learnt that it’s this massive need for a holistic approach. The way to commit to anything or the way to get results with any sort of process is to actually commit to a holistic campaign and so we’re going to talk about some ways of doing that and having a good look at that sort of stuff. In amongst that, of course a holistic campaign talks about plants, the benefits of fruits and vegetables and nuts and seeds and all that sort of stuff. We’re going to talk about fresh and local and how to make sure you can get those sort of things. Of course I’ve got a feeling that would lead into answering some of the questions we’ve been copping about the-

Jeff:

Got to talk about Game Changers.

Matt:

The Game Changers movie and then there’s other documentaries, conspiracies and facts and there’s this big plant-based movement which we want to talk about today and how we think you can do it properly.

Jeff:

The good, bad and ugly.

Matt:

Also point out a couple of the sneaky little tricks that people are trying to push an agenda.

Jeff:

One of the things I’m always going to talk about is the conspiracy around it, being the conspiracy theorist in the room, is the fact that there’s a lot of good information that’s out there or a lot of stuff is true or half true but then it’s twisted at the end for an agenda. Typically that is to depower people and/or to try and sell something or impose a tax on somebody.

Matt:

Yeah, it’s true. In amongst it’s elements of truth.

Jeff:

Absolutely.

Matt:

You’ve just got to find the goal-

Jeff:

Tell me the strongest lie, 95% truth. They just divert you at the end.

Matt:

Yeah.

Jeff:

There is a lot of good information out there and …

Matt:

Yeah, absolutely.

Jeff:

… we’re going to talk about it from ATP’s point of view.

Matt:

Yes. Yeah-

Steve:

Lifestyles, too. When you’ve made a lifestyle change, simple things, we’re going to talk about things like earthing which I remember starting in [inaudible 00:04:46] a million years ago and I thought it was a bit wobbly with regard to its philosophy but when you look at the data on it, it’s quite clear on what it does.

Jeff:

I don’t even know what earthing is so you can enlighten me, Steve-O.

Steve:

The most simple thing you can do is go and stand on the earth.

Jeff:

Right. You’re talking about, and this is really interesting. Having a look a lot at, and we’ve been talking a lot about frequency with 5G, 4G. We’ve been talking about that but also crystals. Matt and I were talking a lot about that as well, too. Had some interesting stuff with a crystal that was given to my son, actually, which is really, really weird stuff. It’s some almost supernatural spiritual stuff happening, which is kind of weird, as well, too. There’s a lot of stuff that we don’t know about but we talk about in science and some … Yeah, we can talk about

Steve:

Crystals has a resonant frequency. They used to put them in radios. That was how you got the frequency-

Jeff:

Crystal radio set, right? From [crosstalk 00:05:36].

Matt:

[crosstalk 00:05:36] watches, isn’t that the quartz watches is all based on-

Steve:

Yeah, the quartz watch. You put a charge through it and it oscillates-

Matt:

It resonates at a frequency.

Steve:

It resonates at a frequency and the frequency per wavelengths is a second and that’s how we actually measure atomic clocks is frequency-

Matt:

We can measure our frequency. There’s a … You know when people talk about auras and some people see auras. Some people see colors and if you’re not capable of doing any of that sort of stuff, you can actually measure it. You can actually go and measure the frequency waves coming off the body to show that we do have this electronic field. The reason why we started talking about grounding originally, Steve-O, is we were talking about ways of making sure people, if they’re going to do a resolution and we’re going to move towards these plant-based diets and we’re really going to focus on fruits and vegetables, nuts and seeds and that sort of stuff, the importance of getting it fresh and the importance of getting it local and the best way to make sure you’re getting that is to grow it yourself.

Matt:

We’re talking about the benefits of gardening, like starting the new year gardening and getting into these sort of habits where you’re actually starting to work not only with the ground, so you’re earthing. Get your hands and you get your body and your feet and you’re down in amongst the ground. You’re in amongst that microbiome. We’re getting the bugs that we’re supposed to be getting, so that actually relates through to the microbiome that goes and lives inside of our gut. We can talk about gut health. We can talk about energetic aspects and we can talk … When you talk energetic aspects, we can talk about it on a spiritual level, a soul level or a physics level and it’s all the same. We just choose different languages because we can talk about frequencies being measured. We can talk about charges that can build up, can accumulate, can blockages.

Matt:

As we know, behind every chemistry is physics. For example, when we have a thought process, that’s actually a calcium channel which is a gate change, which is initiated by electrical changes and voltage on either side of the membranes which actually switch on and off cells. All of this sort of stuff is totally linked. Some people can feel anxious and stressed and dissociated and it can actually be relieved through grounding and that grounding can be done through gardening, exercising and all of this part of the lifestyle change that you might want to have, not just diet and exercise. It’s just important to see that and a lot of people don’t stick long term with diet and exercise. One way to make sure you do is plant something that you got to eat.

Matt:

When you have a look at the themes that we’re seeing across all of these sort of health changing, the big epiphanies that everyone’s happening is that fresh, local plant-based foods. The people that eat less processed foods and the people that eat more natural local and fresh stuff are the healthiest. That’s what all the epidemiological studies that they quote from all of these different game changers and facts and conspiracies, they’re all talking about processed American SAD diet, standard American diet is the SAD diet which is all full of processed foods compared to people that eat and a healthy lifestyle.

Matt:

I’m not going to get too much involved in the fact that this-

Jeff:

We should do a full podcast on that.

Matt:

Yeah, we will. We’ll do a full podcast because the reality of it is that simple core message has been hijacked to sell fake food which is highly processed, highly refined and nothing to do with any of the studies we’re talking about.

Jeff:

Full of nitrates, too.

Matt:

Full of nitrates.

Jeff:

You told me that … Give that real quick example.

Matt:

A quick example while we’re talking about, in the Game Changers movie, they listed off a couple of reasons. We all agreed it’s so cool. Plant-based stuff like those foods we mentioned, fresh fruit, veg, nuts and seeds, that sort of stuff is great and the people that eat most of that is good. The debate comes in is when they said, “Eliminate meat because it’s evil for these reasons.” One, environmental concerns which we can get to at another time, because I don’t know too much about all that.

Jeff:

Farting cows.

Matt:

They mentioned TMAO, which is trimethylamine oxide. I think that’s how you say it, and nitrosamines. They said they’re the reasons why meat is bad and that even a small amount of meat will kill you, because of those-

Jeff:

Nitrosamine’s in meat.

Matt:

The reality is there is no nitrosamines in mean normally. They’re a preservative that’s add to processed foods.

Jeff:

Right, like salamis, that sort of thing.

Matt:

Or processed plant meat alternatives. There’s more nitrosamines in the processed plant meat alternative, because nitrosamine’s a flavor agent.

Jeff:

Right.

Matt:

They’re curing things. They add those smoky flavors. They add that nice savory, that umami but they’re also preservatives and that sort of stuff. Interesting, they’re also vasodilators. Most people that you know if you react to nitrosamines, they’re one of the vasoactive amines that cause migraines. They cause flushing and redness on the skin because what they do is they work as vasodilators. They’re vasoactive. They make arteries throb.

Jeff:

MSG’s got to be one, right?

Matt:

Yeah, yeah. For sure.

Steve:

It’s glutamine is an excitatory neurotransmitter which draws vaso-

Matt:

They’re basically saying it, and it’s been linked in with bowel cancers and that sort of stuff but they’re saying that meat is where it’s found. It’s not found in meat unless you add it, so it’s processed meat. Interesting part, they talked about at early in the Game Changers movie …

Jeff:

It’s disappointing.

Matt:

… and why they do it but later on, they try to quickly distract us over here, shaking their hands around about something else and then came back to a point where they were going to prove something. I had to give enough sections away so people forgot about something or didn’t research it too much because then what they did later on in the show, they’re talking about woodies. They’re basically saying blokes-

Jeff:

Erections.

Matt:

Yeah, yeah. Saying there’s a theory that men eating meat improves your libido and makes you more of a cave man and a real manly man. A lot of that came from the fact that Kellogg’s invented corn flakes to suppress your libido and stop people from having meat for breakfast because you play with the devil’s joystick all day. The Seventh Day Adventists I think it was that did the Kellogg’s and that sort of stuff went through and said that you’ve got to suppress your libido by having cornflakes for breakfast. That’s what Kellogg’s cornflakes were made to suppress your libido so that you’re not eating meat and eggs for breakfast and going out there …

Jeff:

[crosstalk 00:11:32] intentions-

Matt:

… like a real man shagging stuff and playing with the devil’s joystick if you’re not getting lucky.

Jeff:

It’s funny because Steve and I were talking about-

Steve:

[crosstalk 00:11:37].

Matt:

I don’t want to know about you playing with each other’s devil’s joysticks.

Jeff:

Okay, then we won’t talk about it.

Matt:

I’m never going to go to Xbox night with you guys ever again.

Steve:

Oh dear.

Matt:

Then what they did is then they’re saying it but in reality it’s the plant-eating guys that have the most sexual prowess. To prove it, what they did is they got the penis guy. That’s what he calls himself.

Jeff:

Wow.

Matt:

He wrote a book called The Penis Book. I says, “I wrote the book on penis.” This guy’s an expert when it comes to erections. That’s what he’s dedicated his life to, helping blokes-

Jeff:

I’m not a slouch either, you know.

Matt:

No, no, no.

Jeff:

It’s more of a hobby.

Matt:

Other people’s erections.

Jeff:

Oh. Hobby.

Matt:

Oh, that’s a hobby. All right. I direct this towards back to you. I’m going to make eye contact-

Steve:

I can’t even make eye contact with you two anymore.

Matt:

I know. I know.

Steve:

I don’t like to learn about erections.

Matt:

[crosstalk 00:12:18] which is terrible.

Steve:

Don’t look at me, you two. Don’t look at me.

Matt:

No, look. I’m trying to explain this erection stuff and it’s already confusing enough because there’s big words involved.

Jeff:

Big words.

Matt:

Now I can’t put my hands up. No.

Steve:

[crosstalk 00:12:36].

Jeff:

Oh, I see.

Matt:

Knock on wood.

Jeff:

Okay.

Matt:

Nitrosamines, as we said, preservatives, flavor enhancers. They’re used in for the smoky savory awesomeness flavor. What they did is to prove that plants give you more wood … You like that? They made …

Jeff:

Oh.

Matt:

I just made … That was a witty pun on the way, though, didn’t it?

Jeff:

Oh.

Matt:

What? You made witty pun sound like a dirty word. Listen. Stop. For crying out loud.

Jeff:

I didn’t say anything.

Matt:

What they did is they gave these people a burrito to eat and they made a big deal to say, “We haven’t stacked this study to give you the dodgy … We’ve given you the best meat we can. Clean, unflavored, grass-fed, organic meat,” basically saying meat with no nitrosamines. “We’ve given you meat with no nitrosamines to eat and we’re going to measure your woodies through the night and they’re this much.”

Jeff:

How did they measure them, exactly?

Matt:

They put a little sleeve around it. They actually had this thing that they measured the length and the girth.

Steve:

It’s called nocturnal tumescence if you want the technical term.

Matt:

No one wants that.

Jeff:

Nocturnal tumescence.

Matt:

No one wants-

Steve:

Nocturnal tumescence. [crosstalk 00:13:49].

Matt:

Now, the nitrosamines …

Jeff:

[crosstalk 00:13:52] short.

Matt:

… are vasodilators. The very short joke. It’s like a one-liner.

Jeff:

One letter.

Matt:

I can’t [inaudible 00:14:05] put my hands when I talk about this. They gave these guys a burrito with no preservatives in it and measured their woodiness and it was average. They then gave them a plant-based one and they said, “We specifically have given you the flavorsome, smoky, barbecue-flavored meat alternative to real meat made from plants,” and then measured their woodies. What they actually did is they did a study confirming that there is nitrosamines in the plant. There’s process … Stop looking at me like that. I’m trying to make a fucking serious scientific point here and you’re looking at me like I’m doing a dirty joke here.

Jeff:

I’m not.

Matt:

It’s really hard to talk penis in front of you.

Steve:

Don’t look at me.

Matt:

I can’t look at anyone. The only one I can look at is Vanessa because he’s neutral.

Steve:

He’s non-gender-specific.

Matt:

He’s non-gender-specific and he’s hidden behind a camera. No. The point is they tried to prove that meat is damaging your sexual prowess and plants will turn you into a sexual tyrannosaurus. At the end of the day, what they were actually showing is that nitrosamines are vasodilators and that meat preserved with nitrosamines might be a better way of having an erection but that’s not what they talked about. It was a total distraction and the reality is they don’t avoid meat and a clean, fresh, organic meat that’s not processed and preserved to avoid nitrosamines and moving onto a plant-based meat alternative that is going to be flavored up and preserved with nitrosamines. That’s a total …

Jeff:

Bait and switch.

Matt:

Bait and switch. That’s exactly what it is. The other thing they said, the other reason why you’ve got to avoid meat is TMAO. TMAO is a byproduct. There’s no TMAO in meat normally unless it spoils a little bit-

Steve:

Deep sea fish, there’s lots of it.

Matt:

That’s what actually fish-

Jeff:

Really?

Matt:

That’s why fish smell fishy.

Steve:

Yeah, that’s why they smell fishy.

Matt:

That’s why fish smell fishy. It’s kind of cool. The carnitine-

Jeff:

Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Matt:

You remember when you were working in the supplement store, every once in a while some people come back and, “Man, I take carnitine. I smell like fish.

Steve:

Stink. Yeah.

Matt:

Then some people used to probably say that from B-complex vitamins and that sort of stuff as well. Carnitine and choline, when affected by certain bacteria and it’s by the bacteria, it converts to this stuff called TMAO. Basically what we’re looking at is anything that supplies carnitine or anything that supplies choline is potentially a source of TMAO if you have bad bugs in your gut. The reason why meat and eggs will kill some people and other people it would actually lower their cholesterol and make them better is determined whether their choline and carnitine goes down the TAMO pathway or not. The way to fix TMAO is plant polyphenols, fresh, healthy plant. Back to where we started. Fresh fruit, vegetables and that sort of stuff.

Matt:

Your choline is not just from eggs, choline is come from cereals and grains. In fact, whole grain bread is one of the best sources of choline you can get. There’s more in that if you’re eating that’s a stable part of your diet than someone who’s having a couple of eggs a day. The reality is when you go take off all the animal protein and then substitute with a processed plant-based protein or protein alternative, meat alternative, you’re going to get more nitrosamines if it’s a savory-flavored product and preserved and then tried to form into resembling a meat, which still glorifies the slaughter of animals. I can’t understand why they do that but the other one is the TMAO could be coming from your choline.

Steve:

That’s right.

Matt:

Choline from your cereals and grains.

Steve:

Absolutely.

Matt:

There’s a shit load in there.

Steve:

Of course if you eat lots of cereals and grains, which a lot of Australians and Americans do, it could cause dysbiosis in your gut from just pushing sugars and carbohydrates down in your gut. It would cause dysbiosis.

Matt:

Yeah.

Jeff:

Yeah.

Steve:

If you eat it every day, and a lot of people eat white bread every day.

Matt:

Yeah, yeah. Now there’s interestingly been some new changes in regards to choline in food supplements and everything where you’ve got to reduce the amount of choline because they think it’s going to contribute to this heart disease.

Jeff:

TMAO.

Matt:

It’s actually the amount that they’re talking that you can put in supplements is so tiny compared to what you get out of a staple food that we’re encouraged to eat as part of the food pyramid-

Steve:

10 milligrams is [crosstalk 00:18:15].

Matt:

Yeah.

Steve:

You can eat up to three-

Matt:

There’s 125 milligrams in one egg.

Steve:

Yeah. How much? Sorry?

Matt:

125 milligrams in one egg.

Jeff:

Wow.

Steve:

You can eat up to three grams a day.

Jeff:

Yeah, right.

Steve:

[crosstalk 00:18:24].

Matt:

You’re only allowed to put 10 milligrams in a supplement and that’s what people do for nootropics and all that sort of stuff because choline makes acetylcholine but not if it goes down to make TMAO. The thing is, and this is also garlic is one of the other ones that’s really powerful at blocking TMAO production.

Steve:

Yeah, right.

Matt:

This is why garlic’s always been good for your heart. This is why there’s always this mix your garlic with your meats. I love seeing weird old recipes and things we do for a long time and we don’t actually know why. Even the fact that if you eat enough garlic and it comes out through your skin and you can smell it through your pores and that sort of stuff, especially your little puppy.

Steve:

Love it. Love garlic.

Jeff:

You can put it in your shoes and you can smell it on your breath the next day, can’t you?

Steve:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. It’s all [crosstalk 00:19:04].

Jeff:

It’s strange but it is a powerful compound. Again, just getting back to nature, that’s what we’ve always talked about. Again, you look at your heroes of your herbs and your roots and that. Garlic would have to be right up there along with your ginger, you know?

Matt:

They’re all the same.

Jeff:

They’re fantastic.

Matt:

If you have a look at the herbs that block TMAO, things like yerba meta very powerful. Fenugreek’s very powerful. There’s a lot of other, so your garlics, your ginger, a lot of the things that we just kind of add, just these other little flavors, a lot of the spices and all that sort of stuff are very powerful at that.

Steve:

These things you can grow in your garden, too, these simple little herbs. This is what I love about it.

Matt:

Yeah.

Steve:

The garden is a great place to start. We talked about earthing. We talked about our microbiome. This is all in the garden.

Matt:

If you think about it, the process of gardening and eating fresh and local out of your garden, not only are we modifying our own microbiome by mucking around with the soil and that sort of stuff and getting the dirt on your hands.

Steve:

Yeah, I never considered that.

Matt:

That’s where it all comes from.

Steve:

Yeah.

Matt:

That’s why we don’t have to necessarily be inoculated with these particular bugs. It’s going to come from our environment. It’s on our hands. It’s on our food. It’s in our soil but not everything’s glyphosate and poisoned up everything that’s good in the soil and then added nutrients into the soil. We’re missing that microbiome compound. We read that study about polyphenols. What was it? Within 14 days, there was an 80% reductions in the polyphenols which are the volatile compounds found in the peels of …

Steve:

[crosstalk 00:20:31].

Matt:

… grapefruits and the smell and the flavor. 80% reduction within two weeks. You manage your stuff out of your garden and just constant supply of fresh, amazing food and the microbiome. Then honestly, man, these movies … Just to finish off. I don’t want to keep talking about it. Actually, we’ll do a proper podcast on it one day but just as a general spoiler to what our podcast would say at the end is follow the laws of nature. Fresh, local, clean …

Steve:

[crosstalk 00:21:01]

Matt:

… healthy plants, of course. We all know it’s the healthiest food. I just suspect that adding some protein from animals that’s clean and healthy I believe would be a healthier diet than substituting that plant protein for a processed meat alternative made from legumes.

Steve:

[crosstalk 00:21:23].

Matt:

The reason why I say that … I love. I follow that Simon Hill’s Plant Proof and that sort of stuff. I think there’s a large percentage of his posts, probably half of his posts are little reminders to people that, hey, you don’t have to dedicate time looking for protein. When we talk about meat, animal versus plant, we’re often looking at about 10 to 15% of the grams being protein from vegetables where we’re looking at 20% to 25% from meat. It’s not that meat is protein and vegetables are carbs. They’re a combination of everything …

Steve:

[crosstalk 00:22:08].

Matt:

… so there’s no need for you to go out of your way. This whole plant-based eating thing is not about eating plant protein. It’s about eating fresh fruit, vegetables, nuts and seeds and you’ll get your protein out of that. It’s not about getting rid of the meat and eating something made from legumes to give you the protein. That’s not what it’s about. Eat healthy and avoid the dodgy processed stuff, whether it’s processed meat or processed plants, it’s the processed that’s crap.

Jeff:

During our summit as well, too, we had Simon and I forget the other gentleman’s name, I can’t remember-

Matt:

Drew.

Jeff:

Drew. Drew’s going to come on our podcast because he’s going to talk specifically about how he went from being your everyday omnivore, how he changed to becoming a vegan and how it worked amazingly for him. Now, Steve, the thing I want to clarify here as well, too, you changed your diet round your ankylosing spondylitis.

Steve:

Absolutely, yeah.

Jeff:

You removed dairy out of your-

Steve:

Dairy and grains.

Jeff:

Dairy and grains, right? That 100%, nobody can convince you otherwise, Steve, that that worked for you.

Steve:

Oh, it did. For me. I know how it worked now but at the time I thought this was the most stupid idea I’ve ever heard in my life this naturopath gave me.

Jeff:

One of the things I want to hypothesize a little bit is that in terms of with Drew as well, too, is that 100% that diet that he is eating is absolutely working for him and I dare anybody to look at him and say, “You’d be better off by adding this back in.” We are individuals. We do have a different microbiome. We interact with food differently. Tony’s best friend, Jenny, cannot eat red meat. She is violently ill if she eats steak or anything because her body can’t process it. Sometimes that could be because you’re missing things and, again, we talk about the organic acid test and we talk about the Dutch test and all those sorts of things as well, too. Sometimes you can find out if you’re missing something and you can supplement with that or you can make changes.

Jeff:

Ultimately, I think everybody has a not one-size-fits-all. Just because, Steve, you’ve done it, doesn’t mean it’s necessarily good for me. We know that there are generalities in terms of the way that food is being processed now. We talk about milk. We talk about the pasteurization and the way that milk is done now, it’s not the same as our forefathers used to have it. We talk about even grains and seeds, like things like … What’s that wheat that they made genetically modified?

Steve:

Oh yeah. Germ wheat.

Jeff:

Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Steve:

The higher yield wheat.

Jeff:

We used to get all of the husk and the … I’m really struggling today, the-

Steve:

The whole [inaudible 00:24:39].

Matt:

We’re just watching, too. Notice we’re doing nothing to help.

Jeff:

Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Steve:

That’s fine. Yeah, yeah.

Jeff:

All of the nutrients, it used to be stone-ground and we used to get the whole thing milled up into-

Matt:

You get the minerals off the stone. You see what happens to the stone over time.

Jeff:

Right. Our food is changing but this is what I’m trying to say, though, is that because people listen to us. Are we for or against a vegan diet? If it works for you. Are we for or against omnivore diet? If it works for you. The thing is that just because somebody else does it doesn’t necessarily mean it will be the perfect fit for you but it doesn’t mean you shouldn’t explore these things or be at least have an open mind to explore and understand because I’m for whatever works and everybody is different so you’ve got to find whatever works for you.

Steve:

Evidence-based. It’s incredible when you talk about the microbiome-

Matt:

Epigenetics. When you link in your environment with your microbiome and your own genes and how everyone responds slightly different to things …

Steve:

It’s incredible.

Matt:

… it’s a massive learning experience from a personal level but also a lot of it’s trial and error and just like most things in life, once you think you’ve worked it out, it changes because we’re just a very small part or actually the environment that we live in.

Steve:

Certainly and eating a lot of plants that are growing in the ground is giving us a microbiome that has about the same microbiome as the stuff in the soil. Did you know that?

Jeff:

No.

Steve:

Same numbers.

Jeff:

Really?

Matt:

Really?

Steve:

The soil and the human gut contain approximately the same number of active microorganisms-

Matt:

Per square …

Steve:

Yep, per [crosstalk 00:26:00].

Matt:

Wow.

Steve:

However, the human gut microbiome diversity is only 10% of that of the soil and that was published in microorganisms this year.

Jeff:

Why is that, Steve?

Steve:

Because of course our crappy environment of killing our microbiome, they’re saying we don’t eat well enough. The diversity-

Matt:

They don’t have the diversity in the food substrates. In the soil-

Jeff:

We talked about food diversity but we also talked about the glyphosate. That, to me, is just terrifying because it’s getting down into the waters down deep [inaudible 00:26:26].

Matt:

Does that paper mention, it wouldn’t have mentioned anything about glyphosate in there?

Steve:

No, but this paper mentions glyphosate.

Matt:

Okay. What’s that do to the soil microbiome?

Jeff:

I know that we beat up a lot on glyphosate and we talk a lot about it. The amount of lawsuits that are coming out of the woodwork right now, they have bought Monsanto I think last year or the year before, I reckon it’s probably one of the worst things that they did for their share price because it’s taken a massive hit because all of these lawsuits have just come out of the ground. We’re talking about significant judgments about cancers and that sort of stuff and I think even it’s under review in many countries around the world now exactly the warnings and things that comes with it. These are the sorts of things that we’ve been rabbiting on about for years.

Steve:

Speaking of rabbiting on for years, this is a paper on glyphosate and sort of microbiome and basically you might think, “Yeah, it’s going to be bad for it.” This was published in 1981. It said it wipes out the microbiome in the soil, causes massive decrease in O2 uptake because soil has microorganisms which takes up oxygen and pumps out carbon dioxide most of the time except during a drought. It doesn’t pump out CO2 then

Matt:

Oh, good for the environment.

Steve:

Yeah. As you know the body, you can suppress the carbon in soil due to the microbiome when you grow the plants. That was an idea-

Matt:

What do they do at night?

Steve:

Plants?

Matt:

These bugs, so they’re respiration obviously.

Steve:

Yeah, they’re-

Matt:

They’re sucking in oxygen and they’re pumping out carbon dioxide.

Steve:

That’s right, little buggers.

Matt:

All day.

Steve:

All day and all night, by the way, because the bugs are respiratory things like us.

Jeff:

How big is that compared to the carbon footprint of the planet? Do we know? Is there any studies on it?

Matt:

It’d have to be massive, significant.

Steve:

Yeah, there is studies. It is the most significant next to volcanoes and termites. Yeah.

Jeff:

Cow farts and all this.

Steve:

Cow farts are-

Jeff:

The difference is cow farts is methane as opposed to carbon dioxide. As I said, I’ve got a massive bug bear with people carrying on about carbon dioxide as being a problem. It’s not. I am far more concerned in the environment for glyphosate, to tell you the truth, over carbon dioxide. I’m far more concerned about carbon monoxide on-

Steve:

Yeah, poisonous for humans.

Jeff:

Heavy metals, that sort of stuff is what I’m more concerned-

Steve:

Can I-

Matt:

You know what I’m freaking out about?

Steve:

Yeah, okay.

Matt:

You know this whole time I’ve had this houseplant. At night it chokes me. It comes into my room … It doesn’t but it takes all the oxygen. I didn’t realize there was a lot of people. I actually made a comment and there was one of these environmental posts about humans are going to kill the world because we breathe out carbon dioxide but plants can save the world because they take that carbon dioxide in and breathe in oxygen. I just made a comment, “But when the sun goes down, they switch to respiration.” Everyone thought I was trying to destroy the environment and the universe, so anyone out there that got offended by that comment, I meant no intention. I was just reminding you that when the sun goes down and photosynthesis stops, the plants then stop taking in carbon dioxide and pumping out oxygen and they start taking in oxygen and pumping out carbon dioxide so they’re neutral.

Steve:

They respire at night.

Jeff:

Yeah, you know what. Don’t let science and facts get in the way of my new world religion, Matt.

Steve:

Facts don’t care about your feelings, is the famous saying, guys. That’s what I would’ve posted.

Matt:

Oh yeah, [crosstalk 00:29:32] Steve.

Jeff:

I can see you’re an atheist when it comes to the planet, Steve. We have a planet. I’m playing devil’s advocate.

Steve:

It’s funny you mentioned-

Matt:

He doesn’t believe in devil’s advocates. He’s atheist.

Jeff:

My question then is completely [crosstalk 00:29:45].

Matt:

[crosstalk 00:29:44] means nothing.

Jeff:

Yeah, that’s right.

Steve:

It’s funny because everyone blames CO2 but if I go back 3.5 billion years, can I?

Matt:

[inaudible 00:29:53].

Steve:

Can I just-

Jeff:

Steven, you can talk about that but I believe the new earth theory. I don’t actually believe you can.

Steve:

The CO2 levels …

Jeff:

Hang on, did you say-

Steve:

… many, many millions of years ago or billions, whatever you look at …

Jeff:

Yeah, okay. Whatever, Steve.

Steve:

… was about 5% and now it’s about 0.4% and the planet temperature was around the same when it was 5%. This is not new-

Matt:

Is that why all the giants died?

Steve:

Yeah, I don’t know when the giants died. As far as the earth’s concerned, we are in a CO2 deficit at the moment. I know that’s not popular to say-

Jeff:

CO2 deficit.

Matt:

Oh man, you are most unpopular [crosstalk 00:30:27].

Steve:

We’re only at about 0.4% of the atmosphere and it’s been up to 5 to 1% which is about 1,000 times higher.

Jeff:

We’re talking about carbon dioxide, right?

Steve:

Dioxide. Yeah.

Jeff:

In terms of plants then, is there a net production of oxygen from plants or carbon dioxide?

Steve:

They net produce O2 because they sequester CO2 into the soil and then the soil, it takes up the carbon in the soil. It’s called SOC. Then the bug takes the oxygen, combines with the carbon and then releases CO2 into the atmosphere.

Matt:

That’s the microbiome.

Steve:

Microbiome, yeah.

Matt:

But plants …

Jeff:

Plants, what about …

Steve:

Oh, plants net take up CO2. They net-

Jeff:

They’re a carbon sink.

Steve:

Unless they die, but when they do die they usually end up as coal or the fossil fuels for the animals. Coal is 250 million-year-old plants.

Matt:

Yeah.

Steve:

It just sequesters in the soil down deep. There’s literally tons of coal throughout the universe.

Matt:

The plant itself is mainly carbon.

Steve:

Yeah.

Matt:

The best way to have the plants that take up the most carbon are the growing ones.

Steve:

Of course.

Matt:

Not the big old ones that are sitting there growing really slowly.

Steve:

If you have a need to grow plants a lot and I don’t know. I can’t think of a reason why you’d want to grow plants a lot.

Matt:

I want to eat them.

Steve:

Then you put them under a light and drip feed them water and of course then they photosynthesize all day and all night.

Jeff:

Right.

Steve:

This is where you [crosstalk 00:31:46].

Matt:

Right. You just keep [inaudible 00:31:46] for the environment but what about the carbon footprint of that electricity providing the light?

Steve:

Exactly, that’s the problem.

Matt:

Oh my gosh. I’d say we didn’t want to talk about the environment.

Steve:

Yeah. It’s interesting, isn’t it, that the plants do respire?

Jeff:

Just while we’re on this and we can segue back to this as well, too, but one of the things that we want to [inaudible 00:32:04]. It’s annoying that they call those things segways.

Matt:

I know and how tempted are you just to push the policeman? You know when you lean back, they go backwards.

Jeff:

No, I’m not. I actually like-

Matt:

If they come up to chase you, just push them.

Steve:

That’s funny.

Jeff:

In terms of obviously the impact on the environment at the moment, the bush fires happening in Australia, we should definitely talk about that. It’s funny because there’s a lot of great charities out there at the moment that are supporting. One of the things that Tony saw and she’s recommending all of her friends to do and we’ve done as well, too, is actually go and buy directly from a lot of these businesses that are being impacted. I bought some wine.

Matt:

Yeah, and [crosstalk 00:32:42] plan our next holidays. We’re going to do a big road trip our next holiday. It’s all booked to do a family road trip in a van, New South Wales, Victoria, stopping at every little place that we can, give them our money. I did a trip around Australia once. I wasn’t supposed. I was supposed to go to Darwin for four weeks and I flipped a coin when I was going to go home and …

Jeff:

You told me about this.

Matt:

… it told me to go to Broom instead so it took me almost 12 months to go around Australia. It took me, in the bottom corner of WA, there was little sections and I just got stuck for months because there’s so many wicked little produce things and little shops and when you’re in no rush and you’ve got no timeline, you just stop everywhere and that’s a good way to support these people rebuilding.

Jeff:

Yeah, because I think Victoria as well, too, is saying that New South Wales is getting a lot of support, which is great. Victoria was saying it needs a bit more support as well, too.

Matt:

Wires is one of the wildlife funds. That’s New South Wales, so they don’t-

Jeff:

Oh, the wildlife. The impact on wild …

Matt:

It’s so massive.

Jeff:

That really gets … Tony doesn’t like people but she likes animals so she’s always talking about that, which I can understand. Most people are dicks, let’s face it.

Matt:

She’d love wombats, at the moment. Did you hear what the wombats are doing? I love this. The wombats, they make these massive … For the international listeners in particular, wombats are big ass animals but they burrow underground. They have these massive tunnels and cave systems underground so when the fires are coming they’re relatively protected from that. Smoke goes upwards and all that sort of stuff so they’re good but they’re actually been bringing other animals in to protect them and shelter them …

Jeff:

That’s crazy.

Matt:

… into their little burrows. Now there’s even evidence apparently that they’re herding them in. They’re outside the burrows yelling out and they got all the animals that normally kill them, because everything in Australia wants to kill you. Even the quokkas, as cute as they look, they want to kill you. They just can’t.

Jeff:

That’s a [quok 00:34:26] of shit.

Matt:

That’s why the bilbies are almost gone, because they pick too many fights.

Jeff:

They got knives in their pouches.

Matt:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. You’d call me big ears? Another thing, I put up a post the other day because I saw a couple of other articles and a couple other people sharing this information. Another thing, if you’re actually in the scrub and you’re in the regions where these are affected and you do come across a koala and that sort of stuff …

Jeff:

Oh, this is fascinating.

Matt:

… there’s a lot of photos of people showing how they’re feeding these koalas water and that sort of stuff. You need to understand that koalas, they’re like dogs. They lap water out of puddles. They normally don’t drink water. Normally they-

Steve:

They get it from the leaves, right?

Matt:

Yeah, exactly. They get enough out of the leaves.

Steve:

Koala means seldom drink in aboriginal, if you want to know.

Matt:

Is that right?

Steve:

Yeah.

Jeff:

Is that right?

Steve:

Yeah. Sorry for the useless fact.

Matt:

That’s not useless. This is excellent.

Jeff:

It’s very interesting.

Steve:

[crosstalk 00:35:16] these things seldom drunk so that’s how the name koala.

Matt:

[inaudible 00:35:21], no?

Steve:

Yes.

Matt:

They go through and they lap water out of puddles. If you come across a koala and you’ve got a water bottle, if they tilt their head back and you put water down, it goes into their lungs and they drown so it’s very important, put it into a puddle or into a hand or into a bowl or just spray it so they can lick it like you do with dogs under a tap and that sort of stuff so you don’t drown the koalas. That’s important but what charities do you reckon?

Jeff:

You’re saying … Just on that, you’re saying that these poor people that were out there trying to help koalas are sort of being vilified a little bit and [crosstalk 00:35:54].

Matt:

Yeah, but I didn’t even want to [inaudible 00:35:57] typical media. They’re trying to get a point across.

Jeff:

Horrible. People are trying to help.

Matt:

[crosstalk 00:35:59] just share the correct information instead of saying it some way.

Jeff:

They have to sensationalize it and make people feel angry.

Matt:

They have to make a story.

Jeff:

Poor people out there.

Matt:

I’ll tell you what. I saw some other good stuff that people are doing. I saw Critter and a couple of other guys, which are good local Aussie guys that used to work with the Nutrition Warehouse and that sort of stuff. They went out there doing this thing called Blaze Aid. I’ve been checking out where the Blaze Aid camps are. They look really cool, man, and if I was a personal trainer right now I wouldn’t be bothering doing burpees on the beach. [yardio’s 00:36:31] [hardio 00:36:31] for my cardio. Make that into a tee-shirt and go join up Blaze Aid. Get your crew and go out and help the farmers rebuild the fencing because the rest of us, we’re giving a lot of money in. These guys are helping to pay. The insurance will probably come through. A lot of these people have got the stuff to rebuild their farm. They just don’t have the labor force to actually rebuild these fencing so Blaze Aid’s something you can actually go in.

Matt:

If you ever worried, like a lot of people are skeptical with charities. They don’t want to give money to a charity that they don’t know where their money’s going and that sort of stuff, with something like Blaze Aid you sign up, you can get into a camp and you can just go in and commit your labor. You know exactly where your efforts are going and then while you’re there, maybe you can take some supplies and that sort of stuff to support the local businesses if you can find any and that sort of stuff.

Jeff:

On that, too, I appreciate people can be skeptical at times of organized charities but at the end of the day the money does get there. They also need-

Matt:

Some [inaudible 00:37:24], yeah.

Jeff:

A lot of it’s volunteer but a lot of it is professionals out there supporting the work [crosstalk 00:37:28].

Matt:

I always do Salvation Army.

Jeff:

Yeah, Salvos.

Matt:

I’m a big fan of Salvos. Everyone associated with Salvo’s on such a minimum wage, they live below the poverty line themselves. You know they’re not taking a whole heap of money out of this business and that sort of stuff. Just like you were saying, you mentioned before, places like Victoria that have copped it a heap. When you give all your money I think to Wires, Wires is New South Wales so you might want to then spread it around a little bit. Look for some Victorian rural fire services, animal rescue sort of things.

Jeff:

What’s really nice is there’s a lot of shoutouts from Australians. This is the good thing about Australia is that while we have to suffer with [inaudible 00:38:05] poppy, but when there’s somebody that’s down and out, Australians do pull together, which is excellent.

Matt:

Oh yeah.

Jeff:

At the moment, there’s a lot of shoutouts for local businesses and some people are coming back saying that their business is struggling. They’ve had to shut the doors because of fire or access or anything like that but they’ve still got their website open and they’re getting more orders in a two-hour period than what they’ve received for the entire year.

Matt:

That’s beautiful.

Jeff:

Which is great.

Matt:

I’ve got goosebumps there.

Steve:

Yeah, [crosstalk 00:38:28].

Jeff:

Which is what we need to do. If you’re listening to this, wherever you are, even if you’re internationally, if you can support a small Australian business by buying directly from them, it’s an easy way, something that you can do that’s not difficult that would mean a lot to Australian businesses. Matt and I, Steve, we’ve all run businesses before and we know how difficult it can be and I couldn’t imagine not only the loss and the houses burning down, businesses burning down, the loss of a lot of people’s dreams. By being able to support small businesses in those communities, that’s going to make a massive impact. Direct action by going to those businesses and supporting them is a really good thing to do.

Steve:

My mate who’s a volunteer fiery, he’s been for years in a little down called Talbot in central Victoria and I grew up with him in primary school. He now works on the farm down there and he just tells me stories about what’s going on with it. It’s not just affecting where people are burnt. It’s the surrounding environment because people are being taken away, so businesses are closing. It’s really quite-

Jeff:

It’s devastating.

Steve:

It’s like a virus that spreads. It’s really bad.

Jeff:

Not to mention the impact on the environment. I don’t even want to talk about and seeing some of the images I’ve seen of the wildlife and that-

Matt:

The air quality and all that sort of stuff.

Jeff:

That’s bad but also the amount of animals that actually been killed as well. It’s just horrendous.

Matt:

The vegetation will come back better. It’ll actually thrive because of it. It’s important to actually do burn-offs to get rid of the undergrowth. In fact, that was part of the problem because part of the more recent environmental policies by the Australian government to look after the environment was to stop back-burning and also to stop the grazing through a lot of the national parks, which increased the amount of undergrowth and that combined with other factors contributed to the severity of the fires.

Jeff:

Hopefully out of this there’ll be a royal commission out of this for sure. 100%.

Matt:

I hope there’s no knee-jerk reactions just to get votes.

Jeff:

No, no. I was going to say-

Matt:

That’s what I want because if you go through and say, “Look,” because, like I said, this problem may have been made a little bit worse because of an environmental policy that wasn’t thought through.

Jeff:

That’s typically what seems to happen.

Matt:

I don’t know everything about it.

Jeff:

No, no. I was going to say, too, as well, man, I think at the moment … I think already I’m hearing a lot of chatter around conspiracies and all sorts of things but let’s put that to the side and let’s just focus on helping the Australian businesses and people and animals and supporting whatever we can. Then dare I say, out of the ashes, then we can obviously start looking at what the problems was. I believe there will be a royal commission into this and there’ll be some …

Steve:

[crosstalk 00:40:57].

Jeff:

… definite action that’s taken hopefully for the good and we’ll get the politics out of it and grandstanding.

Matt:

Increased awareness to the animals alone is a good thing. We’re going to get a lot of this investment that people have made through the charity will go to help the injured animals but the best thing is what’s going to happen after that, what sort of infrastructure. There’s a new one, too. James Newbury and Brinkley Davies, I love Brinkley Davies. She’s got this Balu Blue I think it’s called but, shit, I should’ve probably checked that name up properly. We’ll add a link into something that some adult will do when I’m not here. Brinkley Davies on Instagram, you can look it up and there’ll be links and James Newbury’s talking about it as well. They’re trying to coordinate groups of people to help time after, so they’re taking on funding at the moment as well but it’s all about replanting, rebuilding, getting people involved in managing the environment themselves, which I think’s a really good one as well rather than just funding something.

Jeff:

Do you have any … I’ve heard but I haven’t kept up with it but the size of the devastation through Australia at the moment dwarfs what happened in the Amazon. I think it’s dwarfed … The amount of the hectares. I had a look a while ago on Kangaroo Island, basically most of that got burnt.

Steve:

Half it was burnt and it’s an extraordinarily large amount. It’s not just in New South Wales or Victoria. It’s throughout South Australia. We’ve got parts of Queensland burnt.

Jeff:

Yeah, we do.

Steve:

We’ve got natural fires that are going on in Western Australia that are just natural this time of year burning fires, which happens. When Captain Cook in one of his logs when he was going up through Cooktown area, he logged that basically the country was on fire. Bush fires have been around a long time but not to this level.

Jeff:

Were they bush fires? I think they were actually … I’m not sure 100% so I don’t know but I believe they’re actually done by the aboriginal people and they actually did it in a very smart way where they-

Steve:

Controlled burn.

Jeff:

The controlled burn and they take out the animals.

Matt:

If I was-

Jeff:

They actually looked after the place because they knew if it got too big, that it would cause devastation, which unfortunately seems like what we’ve got.

Matt:

As with all things, the original first people, the caretakers of the land, they know it better than anyone. I think we probably should take this opportunity when we’re doing these reviews to go back and ask the original …

Jeff:

Oh, blood oafs.

Matt:

… first people, the indigenous people going, “Shoot. Okay, right. What should we do?

Jeff:

What did you do?

Matt:

What should we do? How should we do it? Australia only has three seasons, according to the [indigenal 00:43:23], so you’re either the wet season, the dry or the buildup. They have totally different systems through that and they have different markers of environmental switches because there’s no set dates, of course, for that, especially without their calendars and that sort of stuff. They had specific markers that these things will happen and that will initiate the change to the next season. They didn’t have calendar years. They just had these three revolving seasons that would be moving around and so we need to know how to work with those three seasons. When do you do the burn-offs and that sort of stuff and how do you do the burn-offs safely and that sort of stuff, so you’re not burning the whole country?

Steve:

It’s incredibly important.

Jeff:

Yeah. Hats off, obviously, to the fieries.

Matt:

Oh man.

Jeff:

Nadine, who’s our executive assistant, her husband’s …

Steve:

He is, yeah.

Jeff:

… a fiery. A volunteer I think he is, and Lindle’s brother, who works in procurement, her brother is also a volunteer as well, too. It’s cool.

Matt:

Actually I shared some people’s posts and that sort of stuff to bring awareness and that sort of stuff and then I did my own and that sort of stuff on Instagram or whatever but genuinely hesitated a fair bit to do that because I hadn’t actually gone and been a firefighter myself. I was actually thinking, “Shit, if I put this out,” because I know what Australia’s like, “I’m going to get hacked at about not actually volunteering myself as a fireman.” That’s why I went through and worked out where my services may actually be useful. As a fat, unfit asthmatic, I don’t think the frontline is where I belong.

Jeff:

No.

Matt:

You know what I mean?

Jeff:

You can support financially.

Matt:

You go through, I know I can do financially. I know we can do spread the word and that sort of stuff. I know that something like the Blaze Aid is something I can definitely do.

Steve:

That’s good.

Matt:

The food bank Queensland, food bank New Zealand, every state’s got a food bank that you can go and give them actual food.

Steve:

Yeah, your local churches and charities also.

Matt:

All that sort of stuff. Then I think the Blaze Aid is something that I’d feel confident and comfortable that I would actually be useful and not a burden and that’s something I could really help with, so that’s something I’m going to sign up with.

Steve:

That’s good.

Jeff:

The nice thing as well, too, is that today I read that there’s a massive monsoon trough coming through apparently. Apparently it’s going to be blanketing most of the coastal regions all through Australia.

Matt:

Good.

Jeff:

There’s going to be some relief. They’re still saying that it might help with some of the smaller fires, like we’re talking 50 millimeters and that sort of stuff falling, which is pretty cool. Even out to Longreach and other places like that that are affected by drought, which Australia’s been in bad drought and we haven’t been talking enough about that either but that’s good news. At least a little bit. It’s not going to put out the big fires, though, so it’s not good, the coast is clear, because the amount of rain that they’d need to put out some of those mega fires that are burning down there-

Matt:

They had predicted no …

Steve:

Hundreds of [crosstalk 00:46:02].

Matt:

… wet season for this particular wet season. They don’t believe it’s going to come until April.

Jeff:

No. We are now as of effectively today, starting today there is-

Matt:

Queensland we’re getting some rain.

Jeff:

No, no.

Matt:

Everywhere.

Jeff:

New South Wales. It’s starting to come. There’s some-

Steve:

We got 30 mils in the Blue Mountains after the last 24 hours. That was good.

Matt:

Yeah, that’s good.

Jeff:

Let’s hope and pray that that continues and picks up.

Steve:

Just over an inch, for the US people.

Matt:

Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Steve:

[inaudible 00:46:23]. A lot of these are caused by dry lightning strikes, which in fact the cloud’s trying to earth themselves. It’s the same process [crosstalk 00:46:31].

Matt:

We were talking about the earthing before when it builds up the static-

Steve:

Yeah, because if you think of an atom, if you remember the old chemistry, you got this nucleus with a couple of things in it, neutrons and [inaudible 00:46:40] things flying around it called electrons. The electrons can get knocked off and when clouds rub together, they knock the electrons off and where do they get the electrons from? The earth.

Jeff:

Nice.

Matt:

Is that what happens when you do that staticky thing?

Steve:

Yeah, it knocks the electrons off.

Matt:

When you rub your feet on the carpet and then zap your kid.

Steve:

Exactly.

Matt:

Right.

Steve:

You just take electrons from your kid, in your case, or from anyone. That’s what clouds are doing.

Matt:

Sparks.

Steve:

They’re just taking electrons.

Jeff:

That’s cool.

Steve:

Lightning actually comes from the earth or from another cloud. Electrons of course causes that tree or whatever is poking up to basically explode apart and the friction in that causes the heat and causes of course the fires and that’s how a fire’s tarted. Humans, when we go and earth ourselves, same things. We take electrons from the ground because we’re rubbing up against things. We’re wearing clothes so we’re knocking electrons off ourselves.

Jeff:

Yeah, Steve. You’ve got to stop doing that. You’ve got to-

Matt:

It’s weird.

Steve:

As I said, the studies just from going out in the garden, the simple things, it’s things like it reduces inflammation, pain, stress, improves blood flow, energy, sleep and generates greater wellbeing and that’s published in a paper just this year-

Matt:

How do you know?

Jeff:

Wow.

Matt:

If you’re building up with these charges, you got to remember that they are on switches for these voltage gates so you may have trouble to switch off. You get a little bit of restlessness, you have trouble switching off the mind. You’ll get tickly, itchy like you have to keep moving, restless legs and all that sort of stuff. You really travel … Electrical stuff will go firing everywhere. Then also, too, you can get extremely dry skin. It actually creates weird dry skin. Of course Steve-O mentioned anxieties, inflammations and all those sort of things would be much worse. You just get into the routine around you.

Steve:

Can I tell you a very quick medical test you can do on yourself? Has everyone got a multimeter? Does everyone know what that is?

Matt:

I don’t have one.

Steve:

Yeah. Okay. It measures voltage and that sort of thing. You get the positive or negative, it doesn’t really matter, stick it in the damp earth and then hold the other end and watch the amp [crosstalk 00:48:37]. Watch the amp meter go up because amps is just a measure of current flow, which is voltage flow. You can actually measure your actual potential to the earth.

Jeff:

Wow.

Steve:

Then just go out in the earth in the soil when it’s damp to conduct electricity, for electricity to flow, to charge particles that are free to move and water’s a good conductor.

Jeff:

I was going to say, obviously, Matt, you talk about it a lot. You feel at home when you’re down there at the beach. In Australia, most of our people is normally within about an hour’s drive of the beach, which we’re pretty fortunate that sort of stuff. That would obviously be a great opportunity.

Steve:

Of course it does.

Jeff:

With your bare feet, along the beach.

Matt:

This is the problem with jet lag, too. One of the biggest tricks for jet lag is when you go travel up there, you build up crazy amounts of static and you definitely need grounding.

Jeff:

You’re up in the atmosphere, right? You actually-

Matt:

There’s more oxidative stress up there than when you’re heading into Fukushima. I’m not even joking.

Jeff:

Really?

Matt:

I watched this documentary once about the Fukushima and they were going through all of these different parts of the Fukushima and … I think I’m saying it wrong but it’s-

Jeff:

It’s pretty fucked there.

Steve:

No, it’s Fukushima.

Matt:

Is it, right?

Steve:

Just be careful how you say it.

Matt:

That idiot just keeps laughing at me every time I say.

Steve:

Oh, no. You just got to be careful how you say it.

Matt:

They were getting right in amongst it and they said, “Look, we actually still have another Geiger counter.” He turned it on in the airplane even though you’re not allowed to just to get a reading and it was off the charts. He says that, “We still actually haven’t hit the level of radiation that we had in the airplane on the flight over.”

Steve:

What?

Matt:

Yeah.

Steve:

What about hosties and all that sort of stuff and pilots?

Matt:

They’re a mess.

Jeff:

Yeah, very-

Matt:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. They need constant … You talk to them, they’re in my naturopath clinic.

Jeff:

Antioxidants must be their number one thing.

Matt:

Yeah. They’re not really aware of it because it’s not something people want to talk about a lot. Their main concerns are for upper respiratory tract infections and if they can keep their sinus under control, they don’t care. That’s where they get a lot of problems with dry skin, bad hair and all that sort of stuff because you lose the weird charges and all that sort of stuff. Yeah. Need lots of oils. You need lots of keep your electrolytes good but none of that really works unless you’re going to do that grounding. I asked you one day, Steve, I thought I had a genius idea where I was actually going to get my bed and hook up my bed to a cable and just earth it in my PowerPoint and Steve-O reminded me that the other reason for that earthing part is if you get a power surge in a different part of the house, to actually take the extra electricity so if get a lightning strike, I’d blow up.

Steve:

You could get some-

Matt:

Alternatively, there would be a way of making bed pads that you could sleep on every night that you just have a thing running out through and into the ground where you could actually earth yourself.

Jeff:

What about magnets, people that sleep on magnet beds and that sort of stuff? What’s that doing?

Steve:

Magnets-

Matt:

It’s reorganizing the charges, isn’t it?

Steve:

It does, yeah.

Matt:

It’s reorganizing your polarity and so when we have a look at our … Every one of your cells, for example, they got positive charges on the outside of the cell and a negative charge on the inside, which is why when the cells get near each other the positive charges repel and keep them away, otherwise our cells would all clump up. We’d have no spaces between our cells. We have an electrical charge. That’s how red blood cells push each other along through the narrow capillaries-

Jeff:

Zeta potential.

Matt:

Yeah, zeta potential. [crosstalk 00:51:46].

Jeff:

If you want the technical [crosstalk 00:51:46].

Matt:

In fact, your liver is responsible during inflammation for taking away the zeta potential off the red blood cells so they can get closer, make it easier to clot in case of stress and injury. Guess what the best nutrient …

Jeff:

Yes, you can say that.

Matt:

… which you get out of the soils and into your foods is magnesium actually can be used to restore the zeta potential by actually controlling the concentration gradient.

Steve:

It’s riveting. That’s-

Jeff:

Would you recommend … He’s breaking out into a cold sweat. Do you recommend magnets for people [crosstalk 00:52:22] or not?

Steve:

Sure. Magnets are a unique thing and everyone’s probably heard of an MRI machine where you get …

Jeff:

Magnetic resonance.

Steve:

Magnets actually go through anything. They can go through any part of the body and that’s the beauty about it. X-rays can’t. They get smashed by bones so magnets can actually penetrate the body deeply and actually reorganize charge. If you think of a magnet, like the earth is a big magnet, right, because it’s got molten iron in the core and when the earth’s spinning, of course it moves the iron around and moving metal causes this big north and south pole business which is a big magnet.

Jeff:

Flat earthers, we have to excuse you here. You can tune-

Steve:

Sorry. Yeah. I think I’ve upset them. Like the northern lights, have you seen those? The green northern lights.

Matt:

I haven’t seen them. I’ve heard of them.

Steve:

Yeah. I’ve never seen them either.

Matt:

Auroras.

Steve:

Yeah, the aurora borealis.

Jeff:

Aurora australis.

Steve:

That’s the [crosstalk 00:53:14].

Matt:

[crosstalk 00:53:14] bumps around the nipples.

Jeff:

No, that’s areola. I always get that mixed up in the mayonnaise type of thing. What’s that called?

Matt:

[inaudible 00:53:17]. That’s clean and nice.

Jeff:

No, I know it was nice but what is it-

Matt:

You put mayonnaise on your areola?

Jeff:

No, no. What’s it called? Aioli.

Matt:

Yeah.

Steve:

[Aviola 00:53:22]?

Jeff:

Aioli.

Matt:

Aioli. Oh, the dip.

Steve:

Oh yeah.

Matt:

Yeah, aioli.

Jeff:

Aioli.

Steve:

[crosstalk 00:53:27] areola.

Matt:

Yeah, yeah, yeah, around your nipples.

Jeff:

I always think of the body part.

Matt:

What the fuck are you talking about? Magnetic earth spinning …

Steve:

Spinning and …

Matt:

… aurora …

Steve:

… those northern …

Matt:

Northern lights.

Steve:

Basically what our big magnet does is it repels solar wind that’s coming off the sun so it protects the earth from this ionizing radiation. That’s what our magnet of an earth does.

Jeff:

I hope, Steve, that-

Steve:

Aurora borealis is when it comes into the earth.

Jeff:

That’s changing, apparently. The amount of radiation that’s the solar winds and all the rest of it. The stuff that’s coming off the sun has been changing. Have you heard about that?

Steve:

Yeah, yeah. It goes at an 11-year cycle.

Jeff:

11-year cycle.

Steve:

It’s called sunspot activity.

Jeff:

We get more solar flares.

Steve:

Yeah.

Jeff:

Yeah.

Steve:

Yeah, sunspot activity, that’s a bit too physics-y I thought for this but sunspot activity-

Matt:

Sounds cool, doesn’t it?

Jeff:

Our listeners are very, very intelligent, Steve.

Steve:

Basically the more sunspots, the more charging you get in the atmosphere which excites nerds who are into radio because you can bounce signals off them and talk around the world a lot easier.

Jeff:

If they’re too big, though, Steve, it can disrupt satellites.

Steve:

Absolutely. It disrupts satellite badly. Past the atmosphere it’s-

Matt:

We need to do a podcast on the sun.

Steve:

We do and we should talk about-

Matt:

I find it fascinating.

Jeff:

The interesting thing is that …

Matt:

Superman’s awesome.

Jeff:

… 80% of suns in our universe are binary.

Steve:

Binary, about 80 to 90 or three. Have you heard of alpha Centauri, the closest sun-

Matt:

I actually have.

Steve:

Yes.

Matt:

Apart from the bumps around the nipples, alpha Centauri is the other thing I recognize.

Jeff:

Beetlejuice.

Matt:

What?

Jeff:

Betelgeus. [Beetlegees 00:54:47].

Steve:

Betelgeus is the big red giant.

Matt:

I never really liked that movie.

Jeff:

That is the biggest sun that we knew of until recently. It’s been dwarfed now apparently.

Steve:

Betelgeus is a giant red sun. It’s in Scorpio.

Jeff:

Ours is binary and that’s where Planet Nibiru or Planet X, when it comes back, is on a 3.600-year elliptical … That astroid belt that’s in the middle of our solar system used to be a planet-

Steve:

Kuiper belt.

Jeff:

Yep. What happened was is when this planet, like Haley’s comet every 76 years. This Planet Nibiru or Planet X that we’re talking about-

Matt:

I saw Haley’s comet.

Steve:

It’s 86 years, remember.

Jeff:

86.

Steve:

Yeah, that’s right.

Matt:

No, no. 75, 76, isn’t it?

Jeff:

76, I’m pretty sure.

Steve:

Okay. All right.

Matt:

I’m pretty sure it’s 75.

Jeff:

Yeah, because it was 1910 the last time they saw it and then 1986.

Matt:

Okay. Google that shit.

Steve:

That could be right.

Jeff:

Yeah, fact-check.

Matt:

Fact-check, Haley’s comet comes around 75.

Jeff:

Planet Nibiru is …

Matt:

It’s 75.

Jeff:

… on a 3,600 … They also call it the horned planet or Planet X as well, too. What happened last time it came through, we think, is it actually-

Speaker 5:

[inaudible 00:55:43].

Matt:

For fuck’s sake. Did she just say …

Jeff:

Hey phone does go far [crosstalk 00:55:44].

Matt:

75 years, it comes back.

Speaker 5:

Yeah, 75. Yeah, 75 to 76 years.

Jeff:

Oh yeah. I was right. I was right.

Matt:

It’s 75 or maybe 76. That’s the way I’m reading it or hearing it.

Jeff:

Okay. You take it any way you can get it.

Matt:

I will.

Jeff:

What I was going to say is in terms of when it comes back again, this is what they call a near earth orbit, so it’ll come and then we’re going to have-

Matt:

Haley?

Jeff:

No, no. Planet X.

Matt:

Oh.

Jeff:

Nibiru, the horned planet.

Matt:

Sorry, yeah.

Jeff:

It’s going to pick up all of the asteroids with it when it comes through.

Matt:

Oh, shit.

Jeff:

That’s what’s going to hit the earth, which is where we also get wormwood which is the revelationary destruction, massive comet …

Steve:

In revelations. Yeah.

Jeff:

… that forms in revelations. Yeah.

Matt:

Oh, shoot. We’re back to religion again?

Jeff:

It’s great. It’s fantastic.

Matt:

Oh, no. I love it but I don’t think we’re going to keep it in.

Jeff:

I love it when science and religion sort of overlap. No, on. That’s as far as I’m going with it.

Matt:

Oh, cool. No. I love that shit.

Jeff:

Yeah, it’s great.

Steve:

Alpha Centauri, the binary star, it’s one of the brightest stars in the sky apart from Sirius, which is one of the brightest stars-

Matt:

Yeah, I’m serious, too, about it.

Steve:

Yeah, it’s a serious star. That’s a very bright one. Actually that is a binary star and they just [inaudible 00:56:52] like that around.

Matt:

Serious?

Steve:

Our sun, you want to know the fact about our sun? It’s a second generation sun. It’s already exploded.

Matt:

Good fact.

Jeff:

Get out, Steve. I did not know that.

Matt:

How the hell do you know this shit? You are so old.

Steve:

It’s a second generation star. It’s only been around 5 billion years.

Matt:

Oh, really, Steve?

Steve:

Yeah.

Jeff:

I disagree.

Steve:

The earth was made from the first explosion of the super nova. That’s why we’ve got the heavy elements here like iron. That’s science, anyway.

Matt:

I’m just sitting here waiting for the comments. I’m going to sit here and eat popcorn. We’ve got the atheists and the Christians talking about the creation. I don’t know what I was doing then. I actually took popcorn out of my box and put it over there. [inaudible 00:57:28] I did that.

Jeff:

Matt, you’re doing it wrong.

Matt:

Yeah. That’s better.

Jeff:

That’s better.

Matt:

The fuck I’m doing. Such a little bowl of popcorn.

Jeff:

You know what the thing is, is that Steve and I disagree fundamentally on a lot of stuff but yet we’re bosom buddies, aren’t we?

Steve:

Yeah.

Jeff:

Bosom buddies.

Steve:

I think we’ve done. Matt’s got a great idea about earthing yourself. There was a study done where they put a reverse polarity of 60 hertz across someone sleeping in bed and hertz, by the way, is a frequency so-

Matt:

Why’d they do 60? Is that what we typically resonate at?

Steve:

No, because power point’s at 50 to 60.

Matt:

Okay.

Steve:

You’ve heard of AC or alternating current?

Matt:

Yeah.

Jeff:

Yes.

Steve:

That alternates at 50 to 60 times a second from positive to negative, positive to negative. That’s alternating current but the alternating current thing is fascinating because …

Matt:

Oh yeah, get back to that.

Steve:

… 50 hertz or 50 to 60 hertz, in Australia it is. Of course if you put a negative polarity under the bed, in other words cancel that out because waves go like that [inaudible 00:58:17] if you remember that from physics, then if you can reverse that, that actually earths someone and you get positive health benefits again.

Matt:

It worked?

Steve:

Worked tyrannically in a study.

Jeff:

Wow. Is there devices that we can buy that can do this?

Steve:

Yeah, there are. There are. The best one is to go out and stand on wet grass, basically. This device-

Jeff:

Is that right? Stand on wet grass.

Matt:

[crosstalk 00:58:33] I’m a little bit confused.

Steve:

Wet grass because soil has got a lot of minerals in it and it conducts electricity so you’ll take your electrons from the earth.

Matt:

Steve-O, you know when we talk about these electrical fields and waves…

Steve:

Waves.

Matt:

How does that differ from sound waves? For example, if I need to be, yeah, like you just talked about doing a 60-hertz thing. What if I was to make a noise at 60 hertz? Would that do the same thing?

Steve:

No, it wouldn’t be because that’s the compression of air molecules.

Matt:

Yeah, right.

Steve:

Sound doesn’t travel in space but radio does because you need air molecules to push sound around. Sound travels faster in water, like three times faster under water because there’s more stuff there to push through. It needs stuff. Radio waves doesn’t need stuff to transmit power and you have a spectrum that electricity and magnetism are pretty much the same thing in the radio spectrum and that’s called the electromagnetic spectrum and they’re interchangeable. A wave, like a magnet, is completely compatible with electricity. In fact, we get a magnet pushing through-

Matt:

But not sound?

Steve:

No, no. Sound is totally different. It’s the pushing of air molecules along.

Matt:

Yeah, right.

Steve:

It’s completely different. Radio waves are different again and there’s longer. They’re like 80 meters is a radio wave that you can talk on. I think [inaudible 00:59:46] can be a lot longer. Sound waves at 50 hertz or 80 hertz are actually just pushing of air molecules, and that’s a very low note, 80 hertz.

Jeff:

Is there benefits then …

Matt:

How do they-

Jeff:

… to listening to music therapy and frequency?

Steve:

Yeah, there’s studies on that, absolutely.

Jeff:

Listening to it, in terms of resetting your brain.

Matt:

There is a 40 hertz. They found 40 hertz is the most … Which is om sound, that’s the most antiinflammatory and healing frequency. There’s a lot of data on frequencies from the microcurrent stuff and everything.

Steve:

There is.

Jeff:

Yeah, that’ll [crosstalk 01:00:16].

Matt:

What about in that sense with the opera singer and they hit that certain frequency and they can shatter a crystal glass?

Steve:

Yep, that works.

Matt:

That is the changing of the resonant frequency … Matching the resonant-

Steve:

Matching the resonant frequency.

Matt:

Matching the resonant frequency of the crystal and causing it to resonate.

Steve:

Yeah, resonate to a point where it shatters.

Matt:

Can you do that with electricity or only sound?

Steve:

Only sound because it’s actually …

Matt:

It’s pushing.

Steve:

… physical-

Jeff:

Steve, your homework, I want you to create the perfect sleeping environment utilizing both sound and electronic …

Steve:

I reckon I could do that.

Jeff:

… magnetic frequency.

Steve:

And earthing? Can I use earthing?

Jeff:

Yep. I want to know how to do it and where I can buy it.

Steve:

All right.

Jeff:

Done.

Steve:

I’ll look that up.

Matt:

Fun.

Jeff:

We’ve got …

Steve:

There’s data on it.

Jeff:

… to block out light. We’ve got to remove our phones from next to our bed.

Matt:

I’ve got a blanket that actually blocks other electromagnetic radiation coming in …

Steve:

Does it?

Matt:

… so I’ll give you that.

Jeff:

Wow.

Steve:

Like a Faraday cage.

Matt:

It’s bloody noisy.

Jeff:

Oh my gosh. Yeah, mine’s more like a Dutch oven.

Matt:

That’s what it becomes like in the morning. Oh.

Jeff:

Whoa. Especially if you’ve got a plant-based diet.

Matt:

I’ll tell you something funny. My wife is now addicted to audio books. My wife’s addicted to audio books, which is the best because she sits there with her earphones in. She can’t hear me fart so I just sit there and I just drop these farts. She’s got audio books and then she goes like, “What the hell?” It’s ultimate. Everything’s silent. I just sit there like this, try not to laugh.

Jeff:

I can smell the sulfur.

Steve:

You might have to sleep under a Faraday blanket or a Faraday cage.

Jeff:

I don’t …

Steve:

Does anyone know what that is?

Jeff:

… like the idea of sleeping in a cage, Steve.

Steve:

Oh, yeah.

Matt:

Oh, man.

Steve:

The Faraday cage blocks out all radio frequencies.

Jeff:

Right.

Steve:

That’s what that does.

Jeff:

Actually, that’s what-

Matt:

I just had some good stories [crosstalk 01:01:51].

Jeff:

Do you know who sleeps in a Faraday cage?

Matt:

Who?

Jeff:

Your mate.

Matt:

Who’s my mate?

Jeff:

Ben.

Matt:

Greenfield?

Jeff:

Yeah.

Matt:

He sleeps in a Faraday cage. He did say that, yeah. He does. His whole house is like a Faraday cage.

Jeff:

Faraday cage.

Matt:

That’s cool.

Steve:

He won’t be able to talk on his mobile phone from his house, though.

Jeff:

No, he only plugs it in or switches it on from time to time but most of the time he keeps it off. He absolutely lives with it. He preaches [crosstalk 01:02:13].

Matt:

Oh man, it’s cool.

Jeff:

It’s awesome.

Matt:

I’m going to go holiday there.

Steve:

That’s good. It’s fascinating, this whole thing. I reckon doing a podcast [crosstalk 01:02:19].

Matt:

I reckon we should do a podcast talking about our place in space and time in regards to how to actually manage that.

Jeff:

Physics.

Matt:

Yeah, because this is big because it involves everything from vestibular injuries and [inaudible 01:02:35] to work out where you are into mineral deposits and it’s really cool, fascinating and it goes through a lot of physics.

Jeff:

I don’t believe in physics, Steve. I can’t see it.

Steve:

You can’t see it?

Jeff:

I’m joking. I’m joking.

Matt:

You feel it.

Steve:

Someone said you can’t see oxygen, so therefore they don’t believe in it. It’s like what if you cool it to 216 degrees and it turns into a blue liquid? Then you can see oxygen.

Matt:

You can.

Steve:

It just depends on the temperature.

Matt:

Whack them with it, then.

Steve:

Yeah. You can pour it on them.

Matt:

I mean, [crosstalk 01:03:04].

Steve:

In fact you can put liquid nitrogen on warts, that’s one of the treatments for warts, liquid nitrogen. [crosstalk 01:03:10] keratosis. [crosstalk 01:03:11].

Matt:

What percentage of our atmosphere is nitrogen.

Steve:

About 80.

Matt:

I knew he’d know it. He’s a smart ass.

Steve:

About 20% oxygen and it’s minuscule 0.4 CO2.

Jeff:

Nobody likes a smart ass, Steve.

Steve:

It’s about 80. Some will say 79.

Matt:

Some will say that, fools. A fool would say 79 when you’re saying 80.

Steve:

  1. No. About 79 [inaudible 01:03:31].

Matt:

That’s like saying Haley’s comet, I don’t know if it’s 75 or 76 years. It’s obviously 75.

Steve:

  1. It was last here in ’86.

Jeff:

Actually, can we find out, is it closer to 75 or 76?

Steve:

Oh no.

Matt:

He’s never going to let this go. Steve-O said 80-something so I’m stoked. We can just take this. We can share the trophy.

Jeff:

[crosstalk 01:03:50].

Matt:

You can have a trophy this year. I’ll take it next season. That’s good.

Jeff:

You go because I remember [crosstalk 01:03:53]-

Matt:

[crosstalk 01:03:53] woman of the year.

Speaker 5:

[crosstalk 01:03:54] depend on the [crosstalk 01:03:55].

Jeff:

You know what? You know what?

Steve:

No, it doesn’t.

Jeff:

No, no, no, because it’ll be a certain number of years, months, weeks, days, hours, minutes, seconds. What I want to do then-

Matt:

Then again, how long does it loiter in the sky …

Steve:

It won’t be that accurate …

Matt:

… because it takes a little while?

Steve:

… because we have an elliptical orbit.

Jeff:

That’s right. We could be closer or further away from it. We’ll come back with the answer. Stay tuned for the exciting-

Matt:

What was the question?

Jeff:

How often-

Speaker 5:

75 to 76 years.

Jeff:

Yep. We’ll come back with the answer next episode. Anyway, guys, it’s good to kick off the year. Thanks, everyone, for listening. We’ll be back with some more serious in-depth episodes next week as opposed to your trifle-

Matt:

With shirt matching.

Jeff:

Oh, you guys are just weird. Seriously, it was very strange.

Matt:

I had boob sweat.

Steve:

I just changed because I saw you guys in the blue. I just bought one today.

Matt:

He thought he missed some of the … Yeah, no. [inaudible 01:04:47].

Steve:

I had to get my gear off in the office there and Brooklyn was just taking photos. It was quite embarrassing.

Matt:

That’s because I’ve told everyone about your nipples. No, seriously, even again this morning-

Jeff:

They are strange, Steve.

Speaker 5:

[inaudible 01:04:57].

Matt:

That’s funny.

Jeff:

They are very strange.

Matt:

It’s because you put those stickers over them to cover them. Everyone’s suspicious.

Steve:

[crosstalk 01:05:02]. They’re nipple guards.

Jeff:

Anyway, thanks, guys. Good chat. There may have been a little bit of editing, which is why we’ve got the laugh in there.

Steve:

Fractionally.

Jeff:

Just a small smidgen, tiny-

Steve:

[crosstalk 01:05:14].

Jeff:

We’ll be back next week with some more.

Steve:

See you next week.

Jeff:

Bye.

Matt:

All right.

Speaker 1:

Thanks for listening and remember, question everything. Well, except what we say.